Perttu Salmenhaara

12 June 2015

Perttu Salmenhaara is a licentiate of social science and a free researcher. He has published over 30 refereed journal articles and chapters in books in eight countries, concerning migration and ethnic studies and labour market integration of “immigrant” women and men. Please find the list of publications here. All feedback is welcome.

Salmenhaara has worked as a researcher in in several Finnish ministries, university departments and NGO’s, producing major parts of Finnish annual country reports for different bodies under the European Commission (EUMC/FRA/Raxen, Migration Policy Group, British Council / Migrant Integration Policy Index).

Salmenhaara obtained his Master’s and Licentiate degrees at the University of Helsinki (2002 and 2005). The Master’s thesis focused on employment offices’ immigrant services in Helsinki and the Licentiate thesis on immigration policy of the European Union, especially on its restrictive elements.

In 2014 he downshifted to become an independent researcher, practise competitive swimming and write a swimming blog.

One of his current studies focuses on causes of labour market integration of men and women of different foreign-born groups in Sweden and Germany. The research design was masterminded by mr Salmenhaara together with the Professor of Migration and Integration Studies of the Erasmus University Rotterdam, dr. Han Entzinger.

Since 2012 Salmenhaara has presented parts of the research in international migration and sociology conferences in Amsterdam, Malmö, London, Madrid, Tampere and Helsinki. More about the presentations can be found here.

In June 2015 the faculty of Social Science at the University refused to allow Salmenhaara finish the phd at the faculty. The grounds were, according to the Dean Liisa Laakso, that the faculty has no judicial obligation to give grounds.

 

Some memberships: Immigration, Immigrants and Trade
Unions in Europe network (IITUE)
, IMISCOE network; Finnish Sociological Association (the Westermarck Society), Simmis